Reviews

OIDOO

“Oidoo”? It sounds a bit like something Scooby-Doo would say… Just kidding. It actually is an acronym that stands for Oriental Institute Demotic Ostraca Online. Held in the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute Museum, it is “a large collection of nearly 900 Demotic ostraca, pottery sherds upon which ancient scribes recorded a wide variety of […]

WFU Museum of Anthropology Online Artifact Database

A nice article (also available as pdf) in the news section of the recently-revamped Archaeological Institute of America website introduces the Museum of Anthropology Online Artifact Database at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC). “The Museum of Anthropology’s collections of approximately 28,000 archaeological and ethnographic objects represent ancient and contemporary traditional non-Western cultures from around the […]

CSA Newsletter

I’d like to draw attention to a resource probably known to some of our readers but not all: the CSA Newsletter. According to the CSA website, “the Center for the Study of Architecture … is devoted to advancing the use of computers, computer technologies, and digital information technologies in the service of architectural history, archaeology, and related disciplines […]

Online archaeological-site catalogs

I’d like to point out two examples of what I would call online archaeological-site catalogs, i.e., databases that provide brief but to-the-point info on as many sites as possible of a specific region. The first example is the Delta Survey. An information centre for the archaeological sites of Lower Egypt, an initiative of the Egypt Exploration Society […]

The Global Egyptian Museum

The Comité International pour l’Égyptologie/International Committee for Egyptology (CIPEG, a committee of ICOM) provided the impetus for the Global Egyptian Museum project (GEM). It is “an international electronic database of Egyptian objects as a tool for scholarly research” (14,975 entries) but also including a version geared toward the general public (1,340 entries). “The aim of the GEM […]

Tutankhamun: Anatomy of an Excavation

An article in The Guardian (UK)—tip of the hat to Heather Baker—drew my attention to an Egyptological gem: the Tutankhamun: Anatomy of an Excavation website. This labor of love by a team led by Jaromir Malek of Oxford University, started in 1993 and finally in sight of the finish, “is ambitious in its scope but simple in […]

Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI) is a growing, well-designed database of this particular type of Medieval sculptures in the British Isles (nothing yet for Scotland though). “Significant quantities of previously unrecorded material have come to light in the course of the project, and there are many examples of sculpture that are […]

Virtual World Project

One of the better virtual-archaeological-sites websites I have come across is the Virtual World Project. It started with virtual-reality movies of excavations in Turkey and Greece but now focuses on Israel, Palestine and Jordan. The interface is smooth and navigation is easy and quick, at least with my broadband connection. Here’s an example: Lehun in […]

Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum

The Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (“extensive collection of ancient vases”) was originally a print series started in the 1950s, mainly focusing on ancient Greek vases. The 300+ fascicules document specific museum collections from all over the world. The whole series is now open access. In its online incarnation, you can browse by museum,vase type, etc. There is […]

Ubi Erat Lupa

VBI ERAT LVPA—in Latin, the letter “V” was used for both the “v” and the “u”—is an initiative of the Forschungsgesellschaft Wiener Stadtarchäologie (Austria) and is subtitled “Die Internet-Fährte der römischen Wölfin” or less mellifluous in English: “The Internet Tracks of the Roman She-Wolf.” “Ubi erat lupa” is of course Latin for “Where was the she-wolf”—this […]