Our Office of Science and Technology Policy Recommendations

Overview The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) recently issued a Request for Information welcoming comments and recommendations for ensuring long-term stewardship of, and broad public access to, digital data resulting from federally funded research. The Alexandria Archive Institute (AAI) commends the OSTP for further exploring this topic. The AAI (http://alexandriaarchive.org) is a non-profit […]

Open Access Week Presentation

A big thanks to the University of Arizona Libraries for their kind invitation to speak at their Open Access Week events. I joined Victoria Stodden who talked about reproducibility of research and Steve Koch who talked about integrating open science in instruction and his research activities (including a great example of collaboration mediated by YouTube, […]

The Walters Art Museum and Creative Commons

From AWOL: The Walters Art Museum announced this week that it has removed copyright restrictions from more than 10,000 Images.  Those images are now licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) Collections at the Walters relating to antiquity include: Art of the Ancient Americas Art of Ancient Egypt and Nubia Art of Ancient Greece […]

Archaeology 2.0 Book Published, Open Access

We’re delighted to announce that Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration is now available via the University of California’s eScholarship repository, at the following link: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/1r6137tb This book explores the social use and context of the World Wide Web within the discipline of archaeology.  While the Web has radically altered journalism, commerce, media […]

2010 Open Zooarchaeology Prize Winners

In celebration of Open Access Week, the Alexandria Archive Institute has announced the winners of the 2010 Junior Researcher Open Zooarchaeology Prize competition. The Junior Researcher Open Zooarchaeology Prize competition awards the best open access, reusable content presented at an International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ) conference by a junior researcher (current student or degree in […]

Archaeobotanical Database in Tübingen

Scholars at the University of Tübingen in Germany are “investigat[ing] the development of prehistoric wild plant floras of the Near East and the Eastern Mediterranean. The geographic area … represented in the data, includes Greece, Turkey, Western Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan, and Northern Egypt. The chronological frame comprises the Chalcolithic period, Bronze and […]

Keyhole Sink petroglyph vandalism

An article in The Arizona Republic tells of the damage inflicted by vandals to the Keyhole Sink petroglyph site in the Kaibab National Forest east of Williams, AZ. This is unfortunately just the latest in a long series of attacks against archaeological heritage in the US. The same article provides a slide show of more […]

Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum

The Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (“extensive collection of ancient vases”) was originally a print series started in the 1950s, mainly focusing on ancient Greek vases. The 300+ fascicules document specific museum collections from all over the world. The whole series is now open access. In its online incarnation, you can browse by museum,vase type, etc. There is […]

Open access also means open for challenges

A recent report—thanks to Clifford Lynch via Melinda Burns—by Kathy English, The Longtail of News: To Unpublish or Not to Unpublish, draws attention to an old issue that is gaining new prominence: published content can be challenged but open-access and Google-indexed content brings even passages of material that was “obscure in practice” out into the […]